MEANINGLESS WORDS? GOOD SOMETIMES!

There is something meaningful in meaningless words sometimes. There are some senses in senseless utterances.

 

The teacher stood in front of the class. The class was well-arranged as if it is a court. Silence reigns in the four walls of the confinement. The alacrity of the students for learning was very high. The prevalence of the grave silence was a sign that an unusual event was taking place. It had never been like that in that citadel of knowledge, an external inspector was around; if it had been an internal supervision and inspection, the students would make noise – it is as if noise is normal to schooling, as fish cannot live without water. If they did not make a disturbing noise, at least they would make a giggle, they would use non-verbal communication, in one way or the other, they would make sure they communicate in whatever form.

This is the advantage of external input sometimes; you may think the assignment is perfectly carried out and well-done, until it is externally assessed; and sometimes, you would struggle to finish a particular assignment, but when it is externally assessed, you would be surprised how you are going to be  highly rated.

meaninglessness 1

Let us go back to that serene classroom environment, we left some minutes ago;

The Teacher (with enthusiasm): Good morning class.

The Students (On top of their voices): Good morning sir.

The Teacher (Moving towards the white board): We started Fraction in the last class. Can someone remind us of what we did?

Many students raised up their hands, but the teacher called one student by name to contribute to the class discussion meaningfully.

The Student (standing up to her feet): Sir, you told us a fraction is a part of a whole; and that the number at the top is the numerator, while the number at the bottom of the separator is the denominator.

The Teacher (in a happy mood): A round of applause for Lovelin (All the students clapped for her).

The Teacher (with optimism): Can someone else give us another example of a fraction? (The teacher called suzzie to answer).

Suzzie (with self-confidence): ¼, 2/3, ….

The Teacher (nodding in approval): That is okay! Very good! Have your seat. Finally, can any other student give another example?

All the students raised up their hands in anticipation. The teacher called on Hearty to give a response to the question.

Hearty (with a loud voice): 5/5 .

The Teacher (with disgust, shouted): Nonsense, meaningless!

The Inspector (cuts in, and faces the students): Hearty’s reply was not totally   nonsensical, it was not totally meaningless. There are some senses in what you think    is meaningless sometimes.

The inspector (called the teacher out of the class): In reply to his answer, you would have said, the whole part of a whole (in this case, 5 parts of a whole, that has been divided into 5) is a whole, that is , 1. Hence, it is no more a fraction.

If the inspector had not cut in, Hearty may never contribute in that class again, and it would definitely affect his performance in that subject and class.

In the Blogosphere, some bloggers’ comments are like that teacher’s reaction to Hearty’s answer, which would make some bloggers to pack in. I’m not saying, we should not objectively criticize, but let us make it constructively, and encourage the blogger to keep riding on the air.

Put those words of yours together confidently, that idea may be for just only one person. There are may be some helpful hints in those words that you think are meaningless!



To the glory of God and the upliftment of humanity, the Blogger has authored two books:

(1)     The End Matters Most, authored by Peter Adewumi. (Print Book, eBook & Audio).

(2)     Attributes of Successful Employees by Peter Adewumi. (Print Book & eBook).

Be Blessed!

Photo Credit: Pixabay

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4 Replies to “MEANINGLESS WORDS? GOOD SOMETIMES!”

  1. I like your writing’s, this one makes you think about it a little in a couple ways, how individuals can look at things differently and/or optimistically vs pessimistically.

    Liked by 1 person

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